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Today, Orbit Books announced that they have purchased two new science fiction novels from Ann Leckie, Hugo Award-winning author of Ancillary Justice and former editor of GigaNotoSaurus.

“The first novel is tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017 and will be set in the same universe as her previous Ancillary books,” Orbit revealed in the official press release, satisfying fans of her hugely successful Radch Empire trilogy. “The second will be an unrelated science fiction novel.”

“Ann Leckie is a major new voice in science fiction,” said Tim Holman, Publisher at Orbit Books. “The unprecedented success of her debut novel, Ancillary Justice, marked the beginning of what promises to be a remarkable writing career, and we are hugely looking forward to continuing our partnership over the coming years.”

“I’m so happy to be able to continue working with Orbit!” said Leckie. “It’s been an amazing couple of years together, and I’m looking forward to spending more time in my science fictional universe, and more time with my readers.”

The two novels will be published by Orbit simultaneously in North America and the United Kingdom.

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So snow. Much McGrath.

Along with the cover, we’ve got a better idea of what fans can expect from the third Wax & Wayne Mistborn novel:

With The Alloy of Law and Shadows of Self, Brandon Sanderson surprised readers with a New York Times bestselling spinoff of his Mistborn books, set after the action of the trilogy, in a period corresponding to late 19th-century America.

Now, with Bands of Mourning, Sanderson continues the story. The Bands of Mourning are the mythical metalminds owned by the Lord Ruler, said to grant anyone who wears them the powers that the Lord Ruler had at his command. Hardly anyone thinks they really exist. But now a kandra researcher has returned to Elendel with images that seem to depict the Bands, as well as writings in a language that no one can read. Waxillium Ladrian is recruited to travel south to the city of New Seran to investigate, and along the way he discovers hints that point to the true goals of his uncle Edwarn and the shadowy organization known as The Set.

Bands of Mourning is set for release on January 26, 2016.

guy-gavriel-kay

Few writers keep news of their upcoming novels as tightly under wraps as Guy Gavriel Kay. Today, however, the Canadian author took to Twitter and announced the title of his next novel almost a year ahead of release. It’s going to be called Children of Earth and Sky.

Little else is known at this point, but given Kay’s predilection for basing his fantasy world’s on the cultures and histories of our world, perhaps we could have some fun trying to put together the pieces and figure out where this one might be set?

Children of Earth and Sky will be released in Spring 2016.

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Robin Hobb revealed the cover art for the UK edition of Fool’s Quest today, and it’s very pretty. I really like the way Jackie Morris‘ art has come into its own and helped to define this series. I wasn’t always a fan, but this is gorgeous and Hobb’s books are some of the most recognizable on UK shelves. Great all around.

The North American cover for Fool’s Quest was revealed in January.

The 2015 nominees for the Arthur C. Clarke Award were announced today:

  • The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey (Orbit)
  • The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber (Canongate)
  • Europe in Autumn by Dave Hutchinson (Solaris)
  • Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta (HarperVoyager)
  • The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North (Orbit)
  • Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel (Picador)

The Clarke Award is given to the best science fiction novel first published in the UK, and boy are there some doozies on this list. I’ve only read Mandel’s Station Eleven (which is sublime), but the rest of the list, such as Carey, North, and Itäranta, includes some of the best reviewed and critically acclaimed science fiction from 2015.

“This is a quintessentially Clarke Award kind of a shortlist,” said Tom Hunter, director of the award. “We’ve got six authors who have never been nominated for the Clarke Award before and while the subject matter may often be dark, when we think about what this list says about the strength of science fiction literature itself, I see a future that’s full of confidence, creativity and diversity of imagination.”

If you’re unimpressed by other 2015 award ballots, you can do a lot worse than starting at the top of this list and working down. Hunter believes that award shortlists should be viewed as an opportunity for readers, not a challenge. “A good shortlist isn’t a statement about what you should like,” he said. “It’s an invitation to go beyond the limitsof what you already know so you can experience and enjoy something new. Why limit an appreciation of a literature that’s built on the power of human imagination?”

More of Hunter’s thoughts on the award, and the list of panelists who determined the short list, is available on the Arthur C. Clarke Award’s official Facebook page.