Posts Tagged: Aidan Moher

Tide of Shadows and Other Stories Cover Art

My first short fiction collection, Tide of Shadows and Other Stories, releases in less than a week! To celebrate the upcoming publication, you can now read an excerpt from Tide of Shadows and Other Stories right now.

“Tide of Shadows” is a military science fiction tale about a group of genocide survivors aboard the spaceship Spirit of a Sudden Wind. Travelling half the length of a galaxy, they’re on a mission of vengeance: to seek retribution against the terrifying alien race that destroyed their home world, and bring peace to the spirits of fallen.

Read “Tide of Shadows” Now!

Tide of Shadows and Other Stories will be released on May 4, 2015 and is available now for pre-order. You can also find the collection on Goodreads.

Tide of Shadows and Other Stories Cover Art

I am pleased to announce Tide of Shadows and Other Stories—a collection of five science fiction and fantasy stories spanning adventure, comic whimsy, and powerful drama—from a star-faring military science fiction tale of love and sacrifice, to a romp through the dragon-infested Kingdom of Copperkettle Vale. Tide of Shadows and Other Stories will be published by A Dribble of Ink as an eBook on May 4, 2015.

Pre-order Tide of Shadows and Other Stories

Table of Contents

  • “A Night for Spirits and Snowflakes”
  • “The Girl with Wings of Iron and Down”
  • “Of Parnassus and Princes, Damsels and Dragons”
  • “The Colour of the Sky on the Day the World Ended”
  • “Tide of Shadows”

Read More »


If you’ve seen the results, or watched the Hugo Awards ceremony on Sunday, you’ll know that A Dribble of Ink won the Hugo Award for Best Fanzine. I seriously have no words. Thank you to everyone who has supported A Dribble of Ink throughout the years. If you’re interested, you can watch my acceptance speech, which has been described to me as “adorable” by several people.

In addition to the award for Best Fanzine, A Dribble of Ink also published Kameron Hurley’s We Have Always Fought: Challenging the “Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative”, which took home the trophy for Best Related Work. She also won for Best Fan Writer. Kameron posted her acceptance speeches for the awards on her blog, and they are well worth a read.

I’d also like to extend congratulations to all of the other winners, and, most specifically, to the lovely Mary Robinette Kowal, who was a lifesaver in the craziness that followed the award ceremony, my LonCon 3 roommate John Chu, author of “The Water that Falls on You from Nowhere”, and artist Julie Dillon, who illustrated the masthead art for A Dribble of Ink.

And, finally, if you’re not already reading my co-balloters, The Book Smugglers and Pornokitsch, please go check them out. They’re terrific blogs, even more wonderful people, and I expect them to be on the Hugo Ballot for years to come.

Thank you.

sword-and-laserI’m proud to announce the sale of A Night for Spirits and Snowflakes to the Sword & Laser Anthology. This is my first fiction sale, and I’m ecstatic that it is going to become a part of a project that will (hopefully) be widely read and embraced by the SFF community.

A Night for Spirits and Snowflakes is a 7,500 word story about a young soldier caught on the losing side of a meaningless war. Soldier-turned-gravedigger, he buries his fallen comrades in shallows graves, their last moments whispering in his head. Audience to this sojourn are the spirits of those dead men, drifting like snowflakes around the boy as he lays them to rest.

If you are unfamiliar with Sword & Laser, the second largest book club on Goodreads, I wrote about my excitement the Sword & Laser Anthology last year when it was first announced. I have immense respect for Veronica and Tom and am flattered to be involved with the project.

I will have more details about the project, including the release date and a table of contents, as those details are announced.

Jo Fletcher BJo Fletcher BooksooksThere used to be a time, way back when, that I used to run interviews with authors. They were fun, challenging and people liked to read them. Then I stopped for some reason. Well, today, the interviews are back, but the tables are turned. I was asked by Jo Fletcher Books, a great genre imprint from the UK, to be subject to an interview. Mostly, we talk about blogging, but there is also discussion about some of the novels that really opened my eyes to the world of Fantasy literature. Since its terribly topical and popular, here’s a taste from the interview that discusses one of my favourite novels, The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien:

What are your all-time favourite reads?

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

As I grew from childhood and into adolescence, I veered away from Fantasy, magic and adventure, replacing them instead with laser guns, time portals and spacefaring. Science Fiction ruled much of my pre-adolescence. I still remember being in grade four, I was nine, and getting gruff from my teacher because I wasn’t reading the assigned novel during silent reading. It was The Cay by Theodore Taylor, appropriate for most readers my age. Instead of reading The Cay, I was reading Jurassic Park. I lost touch with Fantasy because, well . . . I was a boy and Fantasy was full of princesses, unicorns and other such girly stuff. I don’t know where I got such ideas, certainly not from my parents, but there they were.

At age eleven, however, my mom finally convinced me to give The Hobbit a shot. She was an avid reader of both Fantasy and Science Fiction, and rarely steered me wrong. I expect the only reason I gave The Hobbit a shot, however, was because of the languorous, fiery Smaug, stretched out atop his pile of gold, scrolls of gold-etched dwarfish runes capped the top and bottom of the book’s cover. It was pretty cool. I still own that copy of The Hobbit I read it, and fell in love. The rest, if you’ll pardon the expression, is history.

You can read the rest of the interview on Jo Fletcher Books’ website. I hope you enjoy it.