Posts Tagged: Science Fiction

cyberpunk_icon_by_sparrow_chan-d79orkx
Rayguns, spaceships,
and selfie-sticks

Ever noticed how the computers in Star Wars are so unbelievably dumb? C3PO, a being of pure logic and electrons, needs therapy more than anyone else in the galaxy. R2-D2 doesn’t have a method of communication that is, you know, intelligible to its owners without a peripheral. The Millennium Falcon doesn’t even have autopilot. It’s no mystery why, of course. Star Wars is a product of its time: a time when a computer behaving like a human being was as far advanced as we could imagine.

We loves our technology in science fiction. Time machines, cloning machines, robots. Space elevators and spaceships, ansibles and universal translators. A lot of the science in science fiction is machinery, and a lot of the fiction is tracing through the implications of those technologies.

You know what you don’t see a whole lot of, though? Text messages. Video games. Selfies. Dating sites. You know, the everyday stuff we have right now. Read More »

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A Chinese artist, known online as Shark’s Den, is producing some of today’s most incredible science fiction and fantasy book covers. Colourful and frenetic, hyper-detailed and lovingly bold, it’s as easy to get lost in the illustrations as it is in the novels themselves. From John Scalzi’s Old Man’s War to George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, The Legend of Korra and Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, Shark’s Den has created incredible covers and artwork for some of SFF’s most beloved authors and series.

More of Shark’s Den’s work is available in his DeviantArt Gallery.

ann-leckie

Today, Orbit Books announced that they have purchased two new science fiction novels from Ann Leckie, Hugo Award-winning author of Ancillary Justice and former editor of GigaNotoSaurus.

“The first novel is tentatively scheduled for Fall 2017 and will be set in the same universe as her previous Ancillary books,” Orbit revealed in the official press release, satisfying fans of her hugely successful Radch Empire trilogy. “The second will be an unrelated science fiction novel.”

“Ann Leckie is a major new voice in science fiction,” said Tim Holman, Publisher at Orbit Books. “The unprecedented success of her debut novel, Ancillary Justice, marked the beginning of what promises to be a remarkable writing career, and we are hugely looking forward to continuing our partnership over the coming years.”

“I’m so happy to be able to continue working with Orbit!” said Leckie. “It’s been an amazing couple of years together, and I’m looking forward to spending more time in my science fictional universe, and more time with my readers.”

The two novels will be published by Orbit simultaneously in North America and the United Kingdom.

The 2015 nominees for the Arthur C. Clarke Award were announced today:

  • The Girl with All the Gifts by M. R. Carey (Orbit)
  • The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber (Canongate)
  • Europe in Autumn by Dave Hutchinson (Solaris)
  • Memory of Water by Emmi Itäranta (HarperVoyager)
  • The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August by Claire North (Orbit)
  • Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel (Picador)

The Clarke Award is given to the best science fiction novel first published in the UK, and boy are there some doozies on this list. I’ve only read Mandel’s Station Eleven (which is sublime), but the rest of the list, such as Carey, North, and Itäranta, includes some of the best reviewed and critically acclaimed science fiction from 2015.

“This is a quintessentially Clarke Award kind of a shortlist,” said Tom Hunter, director of the award. “We’ve got six authors who have never been nominated for the Clarke Award before and while the subject matter may often be dark, when we think about what this list says about the strength of science fiction literature itself, I see a future that’s full of confidence, creativity and diversity of imagination.”

If you’re unimpressed by other 2015 award ballots, you can do a lot worse than starting at the top of this list and working down. Hunter believes that award shortlists should be viewed as an opportunity for readers, not a challenge. “A good shortlist isn’t a statement about what you should like,” he said. “It’s an invitation to go beyond the limitsof what you already know so you can experience and enjoy something new. Why limit an appreciation of a literature that’s built on the power of human imagination?”

More of Hunter’s thoughts on the award, and the list of panelists who determined the short list, is available on the Arthur C. Clarke Award’s official Facebook page.

Tide of Shadows and Other Stories Cover Art

I am pleased to announce Tide of Shadows and Other Stories—a collection of five science fiction and fantasy stories spanning adventure, comic whimsy, and powerful drama—from a star-faring military science fiction tale of love and sacrifice, to a romp through the dragon-infested Kingdom of Copperkettle Vale. Tide of Shadows and Other Stories will be published by A Dribble of Ink as an eBook on May 4, 2015.

Pre-order Tide of Shadows and Other Stories

Table of Contents

  • “A Night for Spirits and Snowflakes”
  • “The Girl with Wings of Iron and Down”
  • “Of Parnassus and Princes, Damsels and Dragons”
  • “The Colour of the Sky on the Day the World Ended”
  • “Tide of Shadows”

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